Tag Archives: UL System

How to identify UL Firestop Systems

flameFirestopping is not limited to just the product, whether packaged in a tube or pail.  Firestopping is the combination of several items that makeup a Firestop System.  Firestop Systems are fire tested and listed with UL. They include the wall or floor, a penetrating item or gap, and the firestop material.

Installations instructions per tested and listed system are published in laboratory directories and are freely available to authorities having jurisdiction for inspection and for compliance with local building codes.

Every Building Inspector should not only look for a professional installation, but also that the instructions were followed to assure a proper installation according to the tested system.

It is important to understand the terminology used by UL and other laboratories.  Testing labs like UL do not approve firestop systems.  Only the authority having jurisdiction approves details used on a project.

The UL Classification designation denotes that a product has been tested for use per a specific standard.  Many products such as cell phones, electronic equipment, etc., have a UL classification with the UL logo, but have not been evaluated as a firestop.

The UL designation indicates that the product has been tested as a system and this system along with installation instructions is published in a directory for reference.

There are thousands of tested and listed systems.  Each one belongs to a particular manufacturer and are tested ONLY for a particular product and specific applications.  Different manufacturers’ products may never be substituted into a design for another manufacturers tested system.

UL terminology for through penetration firestop systems:

The first character defines the assembly being penetrated. The 2nd set of characters further defines the type of assembly. The first number defines the penetrant type.  The final 3 numbers complete the system number and are assigned sequentially as the listings are generated.

By looking at system number CAJ1079 for example, one could deduce immediately that the listing is applicable for a metallic pipe penetrating through a concrete floor or wall.  The actual listed system must be referenced for specific requirements.

UL terminology  for fire resistive joint systems:

The 1st two characters define the type of construction joint. The 2nd designation defines the movement capability of the system. The first number defines the joint width. The final 3 numbers complete the system number and are assigned sequentially as the listings are generated.

By looking at system number HWD0034, one could deduce immediately that the listing is applicable for a head of wall joint that is two inches or less.  The actual listed system must be referenced for specific requirements.

In order to ensure that the correct listed system in being used, you must gather all the information needed by asking the right questions.

There are five steps to selecting the appropriate through-penetration firestop system.  These steps are:

  1. Determine the type of wall or floor assembly (concrete, cement block or gypsum, etc.)
  2. Determine the type of penetration (plastic or metal pipe, conduit, wires, etc.)
  3. Determine the opening size
  4. Determine rating requirements (F-rating, T-ratings, 1 hr, 2 hr, etc.)
  5. Determine any other special conditions.

The same method holds true for finding the right fire resistive joint system.

There are six steps to selecting the appropriate joint system.  These steps are:

  1. What types of building assemblies form the joint?
  2. What materials are the assemblies constructed from?
  3. What is the required hourly rating?
  4. What is the width of the joint?
  5. How much movement is required?
  6. Are there any special conditions?

There are six questions to ask in selecting the appropriate perimeter barrier system.  These questions are:

  1. What is the composition of the exterior wall?
  2. What supports the exterior wall?
  3. What is the required hourly rating?
  4. What is the width of the joint?
  5. How much movement is required?
  6. Are there any special conditions?